Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Halloween Party Favor and Treat Bag 2012 Ideas from HGTV

Send Halloween guests home with one of these adorable party favors or treat bags. Our free printable labels, embellishments and photo booth accessories will make it a snap to throw a kid-pleasing monster mash.
 
 

Indulge Their Sweet Tooth

Kids love lollipops, especially old-fashioned swirly ones. To make these easy party favors, remove original packaging and pop the lollipops into clear cellophane bags. Tie a bow to close each bag, then finish with a printed and punched tag design, template attached below.
 

Thank Them for "Popping" By

With so much candy around at Halloween parties, a salty snack will hit the spot. Whip up some homemade kettle-popped corn or one of our popcorn recipes below and place in scallop-edged cups. Embellish with dimensional scrapbooking stickers (found at craft stores) or one of our free printables. If you're sending a cup home with your party guests, wrap it in cellophane and tie with ribbon so the popcorn will stay fresh.
 
 

Go a Little Batty

Easily turn wooden clothespins into cute Halloween bag clips. Download our bat-shaped template, print it onto card stock, cut out, then attach it to the clothespin with hot glue or double-sided tape. Fill a clear bag with Halloween candy or gumballs and attach the clip for a fun favor
 
 

Cupcakes To Go

Everyone loves cupcakes, especially kids! Place cupcakes in paper or plastic bowls and wrap with cellophane for a portable container they can take with them. Add one of our free printable Halloween tags to dress it up.
 
 

Follow the Ball

This classic game with a Halloween twist is sure to provide tons of fun for the kids. Give each child a set of three white paper bowls with "eyes" made by hole-punching black paper and attaching the punched dots with glue. Give kids a gumball and show them how to play the game with a partner by hiding the gumball under one of the ghosts, moving the ghosts around and having his/her partner guess which ghost has the gumball.
 
 

Candy Favor Boxes

Premade Halloween boxes are a quick-and-easy option to fill with candy or small toys. Embellished with one of our printable tag designs, party guests or trick or treaters will be excited to open them to see what's inside.
 

Put Chocolate Under Wraps

Kids love candy bars after all, who doesn't? For a super simple party favor, use one of our printable wrapper designs to dress up a classic candy bar to match the party decor. Just print the template onto standard copier paper, then cut out the design and use double-sided tape to attach the Halloween wrapper to a chocolate bar.
 
 

Candy-Corn-Colored Gumball Necklace

All you need to make this sweet necklace is gumballs, ribbon and a few tools. Use a skewer to puncture each gumball, one side at a time. Thread ribbon through a large needle and slide through gumball, tying a knot between each as you go. Add a ribbon bow for a little extra finishing touch.
 
 

Spooktacular Sodas

Being a party guest is thirsty work, and what kid could resist these dressed-up soda bottles? Chill sodas prior to the party and embellish right before it starts with our printable black-and-white striped paper and a punched tag. Tie on a straw with twine; open bottles if guests will be enjoying them during the party, or leave the caps on if they'll be taking them home as a favor.
 
 
Rock Star Kids love rock candy sticks.

Place them by the door and they won't be able to resist taking one for the road as they leave the party. To add a little embellishment, cut strips from our printable black-and-white striped paper, attach with double-sided tape and cut into a flag shape. Display on a white platter so the colors pop.

 
 

Mason Jar Favors

Mason jars are everywhere these days and they're a great, affordable party favor. For Halloween, fill with white candy to make a ghost or orange candy to make a pumpkin. Top with a circle cut from our printable black-and-white striped paper and replace the lid. Use decals or stickers to create the ghost or pumpkin face. Tie on one of our printable tags with twine to complete the look.

 

Them Bones, Them Bones

Mini candy bones give these marshmallow treats a crunchy texture kids love. To create them, skewer a regular-sized marshmallow onto a 6-inch lollipop stick. Dip into melted chocolate and, while the chocolate is still warm, roll in candy bones. For perfect presentation, display in small cupcake liners and top each stick with a little black bow.
 
 

Trick-or-Treat Tubes

These clear tubes are turning up at parties everywhere not only because they're adorable, but because they're so easy! Just fill with candy or gumballs and top with a printable Halloween flag design.
 
 

Cookie Monster

Another simple idea is to send your guests home with a sweetly packaged cookie. Whether you bake them at home or purchase them at the bakery, kids will be happy to have a sweet treat to enjoy after the party. Place cookies in Halloween-themed bags, wrap in twine and attach a printable Halloween tag.
 
 

Halloween Linen Sacks

These small linen sacks came pre-printed with their Halloween designs, but you could easily dress up plain sacks with foam stamps or a stencil and craft paint. Fill with candy and toys for the party guests to take home

Saturday, September 8, 2012

DIY Curtains and Shades 2013 Ideas

Do-it-yourself curtains and drapes are easier to make than you might think. With a little bit of fabric, a staple gun and some creativity, you can fashion an interesting look for your home.
These projects can all be done without making a single stitch.
 
 
Napkin Cafe Curtains
Turn patterned cloth napkins into a kicky pair of curtains by joining their edges with jeans rivets spaced every 2 inches. Then add large grommets or rivets along the tops of the panels and thread onto a curtain rod. You can buy rivet and grommet kits at fabric stores. To install, cut a small hole in the fabric, insert both pieces of the rivet or grommet, and use the tool that comes in the kit to press them together.

 
Towel Window Treatment
Use kicky kitchen dish towels for fun window treatments. Simply clip drapery hooks to the top edge of a dishtowel and hang from a cafe curtain rod. The towels are easy to remove for washing and can also be changed out seasonally. Plus, when you've decided to move on to a different window treatment, the towels can be used for their original purpose of drying dishes.
 
 
Buttoned Up
The buttons and burlap that jazz up these plain white tab-top cafe curtains come right off when it's time to wash them. That's because the buttons are attached with magnets rather than sewn on. Tie hemp cord through each button, then glue a magnet onto the back. Cut burlap into a strip 1-1/2 inches wide and pull off a few of the long threads to fringe the edge. Lay the burlap on top of the curtain and hold it in place with a magnetic button at each tab.
 
 
Trimmed Tablecloths
Romance a window with a pretty curtain made from a tablecloth. Look for a square or rectangular one with tassels, ruffles, or scallops they'll add instant detail that you don't have to sew on. Cut the tablecloth into two panels. (A 60-inch square cloth is handy because you can just cut it in half.) Hem the cut edges with iron-on seam tape, and hang with drapery clips.
 
 
Wrapped Windows
Made from shawls found for $8 each, these panels are an inexpensive alternative to custom window treatments. Cut away the fringe from one end of each shawl and hot-glue decorative trim along the raw end. Hang from clip rings.
 
 
Floor-Length Tab-Top Panels
Velvet ribbon in three sherbet shades turns plain white tab-top curtains into an elegant treatment. To create the look, lay out the panels and attach horizontal bands of ribbon with fabric glue. To make the ties at the top, cut the tabs off, then cut six evenly placed, 1-inch horizontal slits across each panel. Finish by cutting V shapes out of the ends of each tie.

Tip: Washable fabric glue will be strong enough to withstand a washing machine and will remain clear and flexible.
 
 
Rickrack Panels
Add drama to a room by hanging tab-top panels embellished with a grid of ribbon and rickrack. Choosing natural colors and textures keeps the boldness of the pattern in check. Measure carefully and plan ahead for proper ribbon placement. Each X design extends from side to side and repeats three times from top to bottom. Glue down all the caramel-color ribbon first, then center and glue on lengths of lime green rickrack. Finish by gluing a large button at each intersection. For a nicely finished edge, cut the ribbon 1 inch longer than needed, wrap it around the edge of the curtain, and glue it on the back. Finish the look with a button of your choice. We chose a wooden button to complement the caramel-color ribbon.

Tip: Before adding embellishments, first press the draperies to remove all wrinkles and creases. Accurate positioning of ribbons and trims will be easier on a smooth surface.
 
 
Ribboned Romans
Confining the embellishment to the edges of this Roman shade keeps the look clean. As the shade is raised, the ribboned edges fall into graceful pleats. We combined several different widths and colors of ribbon. After planning the design, stretch the shade out on a flat surface and glue the ribbons around the outside edges one layer at a time. Allow the ribbons to extend an inch beyond the shade width so they can be folded over and glued to the back for a finished look.
 
 
Stenciled Curtain Panels
Dress up purchased panels with a fun stencil. Lay a panel out flat, with kraft paper underneath it to absorb extra paint. Place the stencil on the panel and use fabric paint to paint on the design.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Easy Organizing Tips for Closets 2013 Ideas

Closets are valuable storage space. Make your closet work harder with a clear organization strategy and the right tools from modular closet storage systems to the simplest of shelves and bins. Check out this ideas that can be adapted to any closet space.
 
 
Strategy: Folding Clothes
If you prefer to fold your clothes or have a lot of clothing that is best stored folded, Meryl Starr, a professional organizer in New York and author of The Organizing Workbook, recommends these tips for folding clothes within your closet.

1- Shelves should be about 12 inches deep, roughly the depth of a stack of clothes. You don't want a lot of wasted space in front or behind.

2- Ventilated shelves promote airflow around folded clothes, which cuts down on the possibility of mold, mildew, and pests.

3- Group like with like (jeans with jeans, etc.). Same-size items stack more neatly. Put clothes you use most in the center at eye level.

4- Don't stack higher than about a foot, and leave at least 6 inches between the top of the stack and the next shelf for easy reaching in.

5- Add drawers to collect smaller items. If you don't have drawers, use a basket or two. Position drawers below eye level so it's easy to peer in.
 
 
Strategy: Hanging Clothes
Hanging up clothing inside a closet is an easy way to keep clothing organized, especially if you have a lot of dress clothes, suits, or dresses. Lorie Marrero, creator of The Clutter Diet online program, recommends these tips:

1- For the double-hang area, put the shortest clothes on the top rod and hang the bottom one as high as possible under them. Use space freed up near the floor for a shoe rack or storage bins.

2- Organize garments by category and separate with hanging labels; the more specific the categories the better. For example, subdivide your shirts into short- and long-sleeve, or casual and dressy. Bonus points: Organize by color within a category.

3- Keep shoes, purses, and jewelry in hanging organizers there are dozens on the market so you can see them alongside your clothes.
 
 
Strategy: Storage for Shoes
If you love shoes and deciding how to store them is your main closet woe, try these tips from John Trosko, a professional organizer and co-author of The Experts’ Guide to Doing Things Faster.

1- Slim shoes, such as flats and flip-flops, can be stored two to a cubby. Use spare slots for belts, scarves, and clutches.

2- Drawers give the closet a polished, built-in look, plus handy closet door storage for folded clothes. Bulky items like sweaters and purses can go on the open shelves.

3- Eke out another sliver of storage by putting a shallow basket on the shelf below the top row of hanging clothes. Use it for things that fold up small, such as tights, T’s, or socks
 
 
Planning: Clean Up & Clear Out
Plan a closet makeover by measuring your current closet to determine hanging requirements and storage needs. Next, you'll need to clear everything out of the closet so the new system can be installed. This is a good time to go through items you can no longer use and donate them to charity.
 
 
Planning: Shelf It
You might think the more shelves, the better but this is not always true. The shelves themselves take up inches of precious storage space, and too many of them can make it difficult to stack or remove items. It's best to design shelves that will fit the various items you have to store.
 
 
Planning: Shoe Solution
If shoes flood your closet floor, develop a smart strategy for storing them. Keep the shoes you wear all the time accessible on shelves if you have room. Store seasonal and special occasion shoes in easy to see clear plastic boxes on the top shelf of your closet. Or simply reuse the original box and attach a picture of the shoes to the front of the box.
 
 
Planning: Space Management
If your bedroom is small, consider placing your dresser inside the closet. You can install shelving above it and still maximize the vertical space a closet has to offer.
 
 
Planning: Closet for Two
Whether it's for kids or for a his-and-hers, a shared closet works best when territories are clearly defined. Place a tower of drawers in the middle of a reach in closet, which will give each closet occupant their own side of the closet. Assign drawers to each person to achieve shared closet bliss.
 
 
Features: Closet Cubbies
Organize your own closet or a child's with a combination of double-hanging rods, drawers, and shelves. Drawers corral small items such as socks while cubbies hold folded items. Upper shelves can store out of season shoes and clothing in clear bins with lids.
 
 
Features: Slanted Shoe Rack
Storing shoes on slanted shelves makes it easier to see the shelf contents. Before installing slanted shelves, consider how many pairs of shoes you need to store and about what size they are. Ankle boots will need more height than flats. You might want to space the shelves differently, or decide on a set spacing based on the height of your tallest shoes. If you have a lot of tall boots, consider storing them elsewhere, such as beneath a hanging rod. Look for inserts that will help boot shafts stay upright at organizational stores.
 
 
Features: Built-In Drawers
Consider built-in drawers for storing sweaters, undergarments, and accessories. Shorter drawers might only store a stack of four T-shirts or two sweaters, which is beneficial because you don’t have to dig through a large stack to find what you’re looking for, but a series of shorter drawers might not offer the same amount of storage space as larger, taller drawers. When you have more drawers, it means you need to have more space for the tracks and other drawer hardware.
 
 
Features: Lighting
Whether your closet is big or small, good lighting will make it even more functional. Look for ceiling-mount lighting that doesn’t need to be hardwired as a quick update for a reach-in closet. Lamps can be used in a walk-in closet for extra illumination, which is beneficial for dressing areas. If your walk-in closet has a window, install a light-blocking window covering. That way, you can keep out the natural light when you’re not using the closet. Constant sunlight might cause some clothing to fade.
 
 
Features: Double Bars for Kids
For a narrow and short space, stair-step rods for kids’ clothing storage. Since their clothing is short and slender, you can hang one rod higher and further back in the closet and another bar lower and more towards the front to get a double layer of storage. Consider tension shower rods, which can be installed without making holes in the wall and are easier to change as the child gets older.

 
 
Features: Double Bars for Adults
Using double closet rods one over the other  is the best way to squeeze more storage space out of a closet. Be sure to measure the length of each item you'll be hanging there and allow another 6 inches of clearance above and below each rod. Blouses, shirts, skirts, jackets, and kids' clothes will all fit on double rods.

2013 Home Office Storage Ideas

 
 
 
Classic Solution
Put an awkward corner to use and add in office functionality with a classic secretary. Although the design is antique, a piece like this one has modern appeal. The pullout desk easily accommodates a laptop, and the shelves above the desk, as well as the drawers below it, can be fitted with baskets and boxes for filing paperwork and organizing supplies.
 
 
Tucked-In Storage
Add storage to a minimal, no-frills desk with a small shelf or table tucked underneath. Look for a unit on casters so you can easily slide it out and use the top as an extra work surface.
 
 
Two for One
Line a wall with two identical tables for a chic symmetrical look. This work space, stationed in a living room, can be cleared of office supplies and double as a buffet or bar for hosting parties.
 
 
Cozy Work Space
Turn an awkward closet into an office with a few quick changes. Remove the closet doors and paint (or wallpaper) the interior. Hang shelves along the wall and tuck in a desk for a quick-fix office that packs efficient function into a small sliver of space.
 
 
Build a Desk
For a simple, do-it-yourself desk, employ sturdy file cabinets as a base and a large desktop, or painted panel, as the work surface. Position the desktop on the file cabinets and screw into place.
 
 
Around the Corner
Capitalize on a corner office space by extending upper cabinetry into an L shape rather than just straight across the back of the desk. Use this newfound storage space for display or for office necessities, such as files and desk supplies.
 
 
On a Curve
A curved desk such as this one provides a work surface on both sides of a computer while leaving plenty of space for stationing storage trays and baskets. Use large boxes to tuck supplies under the desk for a quick storage fix.
 
 
Office Alcove
An underused alcove was given new life as an office and storage station. A basic desktop was upgraded with a pretty skirt to conceal storage beneath. Shelves were mounted high along the wall to create more head space above the desk. Higher shelves such as these are ideal for storing infrequently used items. When needed, they are easy to locate but are kept out of the way to make room for things used on a regular basis.
 
 
Living Room Office
Inconspicuously add an office to a living area with a few simple tricks. Incorporate as much concealed storage as possible, such as these clean-front cabinets, which add office functionality without distracting from the rest of the room. Take steps to add in elements to tie the space to the rest of the room. A bamboo chair and burlap-covered bulletin board harmonize with the living room's natural look.
 
 
Perfect for Paperwork
If you need a lot of space for paperwork, consider this setup. Nix the office chairs and basic desk, and replace with plush armchairs and a handsome round table, perfect for spreading out all your materials. Position a bookcase nearby to organize files and archived paperwork.

Modern Home Office 2013 Ideas : Storage & Organization Solutions


Create a home office anywhere with these ideas for streamlined storage and efficient organization.
 

 
Cubby Solution
If floor space is limited, bring storage off the floor and onto a desk. Place a small bookcase on top of a desk, which will give you a space to store supplies at your fingertips.
 
 
Easy Office Filing
Turn an existing dresser or other unit with deep drawers into a file cabinet with one simple addition. Install adjustable hanging file frames (available at office supply stores) in the drawers and develop a filing system with tabbed hanging folders.

 
 
Hidden Office
Turn storage upside down with an inventive way to use kitchen cabinets. Hang a cabinet horizontally and attach piano hinges to the doors so it can open to become a mini desk area. When not in use, the door can simply be closed to conceal the work area and maintain a sleek appearance.
 
 
A Place to Create
If your office space is used for creative endeavors, such as scrapbooking and crafting, incorporate storage around your work space and keep all supplies at your fingertips. This desk area has an abundance of drawers, plus at-your-fingertips supply cups along the back of the desk. Achieve this functionality by drilling large holes the size of silverware cups into a desktop, dropping the cups into the holes, and filling them with scissors, markers, and more.
 
Collaborative Space
Do you need an office for more than one person? Use a dining table as a desk and place it perpendicular to a wall so several people can sit at the table at once. This table bumps up against a wall of built-ins, which add storage. A large bookcase also works wonders for an office setup like this.
 
 
Office with a View
Bump a desk up against a window with a deep window sill and use the sill as an improvised shelf for baskets and boxes. Plus, placing a desk near a window provides plenty of natural light.
 
Smarter Office Storage
In a small space, take office storage to the walls to keep work surfaces clutter-free. In this space, cubbies were mounted to the wall and magazine holders were screwed into the bottom of the cubbies for an innovative mail sorter. For an easy and affordable work surface, transform a slab door into a desktop by mounting it to a wall and placing bookcases or file cabinets beneath it for support.
 
 
Kitchen Office
A small desk tucked into a kitchen is suited for many tasks, such as doing homework or jotting down a grocery list. Incorporate a few drawers and cubbies to maximize the space's storage capacity.
 
 
Perfect Office Setup
Create a corner office at home by zoning a section of a larger room (such as a living room or family room) as a work zone. Behind this desk, a large bookcase fulfills all the storage needs of this work area in one simple system. For more storage, hang floating shelves along the wall. When planning your home office, make sure there are adequate outlets nearby for computers, printers, and task lighting.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Halloween Party Favor and Treat Bag 2012 Ideas from HGTV

Send Halloween guests home with one of these adorable party favors or treat bags. Our free printable labels, embellishments and photo booth accessories will make it a snap to throw a kid-pleasing monster mash.
 
 

Indulge Their Sweet Tooth

Kids love lollipops, especially old-fashioned swirly ones. To make these easy party favors, remove original packaging and pop the lollipops into clear cellophane bags. Tie a bow to close each bag, then finish with a printed and punched tag design, template attached below.
 

Thank Them for "Popping" By

With so much candy around at Halloween parties, a salty snack will hit the spot. Whip up some homemade kettle-popped corn or one of our popcorn recipes below and place in scallop-edged cups. Embellish with dimensional scrapbooking stickers (found at craft stores) or one of our free printables. If you're sending a cup home with your party guests, wrap it in cellophane and tie with ribbon so the popcorn will stay fresh.
 
 

Go a Little Batty

Easily turn wooden clothespins into cute Halloween bag clips. Download our bat-shaped template, print it onto card stock, cut out, then attach it to the clothespin with hot glue or double-sided tape. Fill a clear bag with Halloween candy or gumballs and attach the clip for a fun favor
 
 

Cupcakes To Go

Everyone loves cupcakes, especially kids! Place cupcakes in paper or plastic bowls and wrap with cellophane for a portable container they can take with them. Add one of our free printable Halloween tags to dress it up.
 
 

Follow the Ball

This classic game with a Halloween twist is sure to provide tons of fun for the kids. Give each child a set of three white paper bowls with "eyes" made by hole-punching black paper and attaching the punched dots with glue. Give kids a gumball and show them how to play the game with a partner by hiding the gumball under one of the ghosts, moving the ghosts around and having his/her partner guess which ghost has the gumball.
 
 

Candy Favor Boxes

Premade Halloween boxes are a quick-and-easy option to fill with candy or small toys. Embellished with one of our printable tag designs, party guests or trick or treaters will be excited to open them to see what's inside.
 

Put Chocolate Under Wraps

Kids love candy bars after all, who doesn't? For a super simple party favor, use one of our printable wrapper designs to dress up a classic candy bar to match the party decor. Just print the template onto standard copier paper, then cut out the design and use double-sided tape to attach the Halloween wrapper to a chocolate bar.
 
 

Candy-Corn-Colored Gumball Necklace

All you need to make this sweet necklace is gumballs, ribbon and a few tools. Use a skewer to puncture each gumball, one side at a time. Thread ribbon through a large needle and slide through gumball, tying a knot between each as you go. Add a ribbon bow for a little extra finishing touch.
 
 

Spooktacular Sodas

Being a party guest is thirsty work, and what kid could resist these dressed-up soda bottles? Chill sodas prior to the party and embellish right before it starts with our printable black-and-white striped paper and a punched tag. Tie on a straw with twine; open bottles if guests will be enjoying them during the party, or leave the caps on if they'll be taking them home as a favor.
 
 
Rock Star Kids love rock candy sticks.

Place them by the door and they won't be able to resist taking one for the road as they leave the party. To add a little embellishment, cut strips from our printable black-and-white striped paper, attach with double-sided tape and cut into a flag shape. Display on a white platter so the colors pop.

 
 

Mason Jar Favors

Mason jars are everywhere these days and they're a great, affordable party favor. For Halloween, fill with white candy to make a ghost or orange candy to make a pumpkin. Top with a circle cut from our printable black-and-white striped paper and replace the lid. Use decals or stickers to create the ghost or pumpkin face. Tie on one of our printable tags with twine to complete the look.

 

Them Bones, Them Bones

Mini candy bones give these marshmallow treats a crunchy texture kids love. To create them, skewer a regular-sized marshmallow onto a 6-inch lollipop stick. Dip into melted chocolate and, while the chocolate is still warm, roll in candy bones. For perfect presentation, display in small cupcake liners and top each stick with a little black bow.
 
 

Trick-or-Treat Tubes

These clear tubes are turning up at parties everywhere not only because they're adorable, but because they're so easy! Just fill with candy or gumballs and top with a printable Halloween flag design.
 
 

Cookie Monster

Another simple idea is to send your guests home with a sweetly packaged cookie. Whether you bake them at home or purchase them at the bakery, kids will be happy to have a sweet treat to enjoy after the party. Place cookies in Halloween-themed bags, wrap in twine and attach a printable Halloween tag.
 
 

Halloween Linen Sacks

These small linen sacks came pre-printed with their Halloween designs, but you could easily dress up plain sacks with foam stamps or a stencil and craft paint. Fill with candy and toys for the party guests to take home

Saturday, September 8, 2012

DIY Curtains and Shades 2013 Ideas

Do-it-yourself curtains and drapes are easier to make than you might think. With a little bit of fabric, a staple gun and some creativity, you can fashion an interesting look for your home.
These projects can all be done without making a single stitch.
 
 
Napkin Cafe Curtains
Turn patterned cloth napkins into a kicky pair of curtains by joining their edges with jeans rivets spaced every 2 inches. Then add large grommets or rivets along the tops of the panels and thread onto a curtain rod. You can buy rivet and grommet kits at fabric stores. To install, cut a small hole in the fabric, insert both pieces of the rivet or grommet, and use the tool that comes in the kit to press them together.

 
Towel Window Treatment
Use kicky kitchen dish towels for fun window treatments. Simply clip drapery hooks to the top edge of a dishtowel and hang from a cafe curtain rod. The towels are easy to remove for washing and can also be changed out seasonally. Plus, when you've decided to move on to a different window treatment, the towels can be used for their original purpose of drying dishes.
 
 
Buttoned Up
The buttons and burlap that jazz up these plain white tab-top cafe curtains come right off when it's time to wash them. That's because the buttons are attached with magnets rather than sewn on. Tie hemp cord through each button, then glue a magnet onto the back. Cut burlap into a strip 1-1/2 inches wide and pull off a few of the long threads to fringe the edge. Lay the burlap on top of the curtain and hold it in place with a magnetic button at each tab.
 
 
Trimmed Tablecloths
Romance a window with a pretty curtain made from a tablecloth. Look for a square or rectangular one with tassels, ruffles, or scallops they'll add instant detail that you don't have to sew on. Cut the tablecloth into two panels. (A 60-inch square cloth is handy because you can just cut it in half.) Hem the cut edges with iron-on seam tape, and hang with drapery clips.
 
 
Wrapped Windows
Made from shawls found for $8 each, these panels are an inexpensive alternative to custom window treatments. Cut away the fringe from one end of each shawl and hot-glue decorative trim along the raw end. Hang from clip rings.
 
 
Floor-Length Tab-Top Panels
Velvet ribbon in three sherbet shades turns plain white tab-top curtains into an elegant treatment. To create the look, lay out the panels and attach horizontal bands of ribbon with fabric glue. To make the ties at the top, cut the tabs off, then cut six evenly placed, 1-inch horizontal slits across each panel. Finish by cutting V shapes out of the ends of each tie.

Tip: Washable fabric glue will be strong enough to withstand a washing machine and will remain clear and flexible.
 
 
Rickrack Panels
Add drama to a room by hanging tab-top panels embellished with a grid of ribbon and rickrack. Choosing natural colors and textures keeps the boldness of the pattern in check. Measure carefully and plan ahead for proper ribbon placement. Each X design extends from side to side and repeats three times from top to bottom. Glue down all the caramel-color ribbon first, then center and glue on lengths of lime green rickrack. Finish by gluing a large button at each intersection. For a nicely finished edge, cut the ribbon 1 inch longer than needed, wrap it around the edge of the curtain, and glue it on the back. Finish the look with a button of your choice. We chose a wooden button to complement the caramel-color ribbon.

Tip: Before adding embellishments, first press the draperies to remove all wrinkles and creases. Accurate positioning of ribbons and trims will be easier on a smooth surface.
 
 
Ribboned Romans
Confining the embellishment to the edges of this Roman shade keeps the look clean. As the shade is raised, the ribboned edges fall into graceful pleats. We combined several different widths and colors of ribbon. After planning the design, stretch the shade out on a flat surface and glue the ribbons around the outside edges one layer at a time. Allow the ribbons to extend an inch beyond the shade width so they can be folded over and glued to the back for a finished look.
 
 
Stenciled Curtain Panels
Dress up purchased panels with a fun stencil. Lay a panel out flat, with kraft paper underneath it to absorb extra paint. Place the stencil on the panel and use fabric paint to paint on the design.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Easy Organizing Tips for Closets 2013 Ideas

Closets are valuable storage space. Make your closet work harder with a clear organization strategy and the right tools from modular closet storage systems to the simplest of shelves and bins. Check out this ideas that can be adapted to any closet space.
 
 
Strategy: Folding Clothes
If you prefer to fold your clothes or have a lot of clothing that is best stored folded, Meryl Starr, a professional organizer in New York and author of The Organizing Workbook, recommends these tips for folding clothes within your closet.

1- Shelves should be about 12 inches deep, roughly the depth of a stack of clothes. You don't want a lot of wasted space in front or behind.

2- Ventilated shelves promote airflow around folded clothes, which cuts down on the possibility of mold, mildew, and pests.

3- Group like with like (jeans with jeans, etc.). Same-size items stack more neatly. Put clothes you use most in the center at eye level.

4- Don't stack higher than about a foot, and leave at least 6 inches between the top of the stack and the next shelf for easy reaching in.

5- Add drawers to collect smaller items. If you don't have drawers, use a basket or two. Position drawers below eye level so it's easy to peer in.
 
 
Strategy: Hanging Clothes
Hanging up clothing inside a closet is an easy way to keep clothing organized, especially if you have a lot of dress clothes, suits, or dresses. Lorie Marrero, creator of The Clutter Diet online program, recommends these tips:

1- For the double-hang area, put the shortest clothes on the top rod and hang the bottom one as high as possible under them. Use space freed up near the floor for a shoe rack or storage bins.

2- Organize garments by category and separate with hanging labels; the more specific the categories the better. For example, subdivide your shirts into short- and long-sleeve, or casual and dressy. Bonus points: Organize by color within a category.

3- Keep shoes, purses, and jewelry in hanging organizers there are dozens on the market so you can see them alongside your clothes.
 
 
Strategy: Storage for Shoes
If you love shoes and deciding how to store them is your main closet woe, try these tips from John Trosko, a professional organizer and co-author of The Experts’ Guide to Doing Things Faster.

1- Slim shoes, such as flats and flip-flops, can be stored two to a cubby. Use spare slots for belts, scarves, and clutches.

2- Drawers give the closet a polished, built-in look, plus handy closet door storage for folded clothes. Bulky items like sweaters and purses can go on the open shelves.

3- Eke out another sliver of storage by putting a shallow basket on the shelf below the top row of hanging clothes. Use it for things that fold up small, such as tights, T’s, or socks
 
 
Planning: Clean Up & Clear Out
Plan a closet makeover by measuring your current closet to determine hanging requirements and storage needs. Next, you'll need to clear everything out of the closet so the new system can be installed. This is a good time to go through items you can no longer use and donate them to charity.
 
 
Planning: Shelf It
You might think the more shelves, the better but this is not always true. The shelves themselves take up inches of precious storage space, and too many of them can make it difficult to stack or remove items. It's best to design shelves that will fit the various items you have to store.
 
 
Planning: Shoe Solution
If shoes flood your closet floor, develop a smart strategy for storing them. Keep the shoes you wear all the time accessible on shelves if you have room. Store seasonal and special occasion shoes in easy to see clear plastic boxes on the top shelf of your closet. Or simply reuse the original box and attach a picture of the shoes to the front of the box.
 
 
Planning: Space Management
If your bedroom is small, consider placing your dresser inside the closet. You can install shelving above it and still maximize the vertical space a closet has to offer.
 
 
Planning: Closet for Two
Whether it's for kids or for a his-and-hers, a shared closet works best when territories are clearly defined. Place a tower of drawers in the middle of a reach in closet, which will give each closet occupant their own side of the closet. Assign drawers to each person to achieve shared closet bliss.
 
 
Features: Closet Cubbies
Organize your own closet or a child's with a combination of double-hanging rods, drawers, and shelves. Drawers corral small items such as socks while cubbies hold folded items. Upper shelves can store out of season shoes and clothing in clear bins with lids.
 
 
Features: Slanted Shoe Rack
Storing shoes on slanted shelves makes it easier to see the shelf contents. Before installing slanted shelves, consider how many pairs of shoes you need to store and about what size they are. Ankle boots will need more height than flats. You might want to space the shelves differently, or decide on a set spacing based on the height of your tallest shoes. If you have a lot of tall boots, consider storing them elsewhere, such as beneath a hanging rod. Look for inserts that will help boot shafts stay upright at organizational stores.
 
 
Features: Built-In Drawers
Consider built-in drawers for storing sweaters, undergarments, and accessories. Shorter drawers might only store a stack of four T-shirts or two sweaters, which is beneficial because you don’t have to dig through a large stack to find what you’re looking for, but a series of shorter drawers might not offer the same amount of storage space as larger, taller drawers. When you have more drawers, it means you need to have more space for the tracks and other drawer hardware.
 
 
Features: Lighting
Whether your closet is big or small, good lighting will make it even more functional. Look for ceiling-mount lighting that doesn’t need to be hardwired as a quick update for a reach-in closet. Lamps can be used in a walk-in closet for extra illumination, which is beneficial for dressing areas. If your walk-in closet has a window, install a light-blocking window covering. That way, you can keep out the natural light when you’re not using the closet. Constant sunlight might cause some clothing to fade.
 
 
Features: Double Bars for Kids
For a narrow and short space, stair-step rods for kids’ clothing storage. Since their clothing is short and slender, you can hang one rod higher and further back in the closet and another bar lower and more towards the front to get a double layer of storage. Consider tension shower rods, which can be installed without making holes in the wall and are easier to change as the child gets older.

 
 
Features: Double Bars for Adults
Using double closet rods one over the other  is the best way to squeeze more storage space out of a closet. Be sure to measure the length of each item you'll be hanging there and allow another 6 inches of clearance above and below each rod. Blouses, shirts, skirts, jackets, and kids' clothes will all fit on double rods.

2013 Home Office Storage Ideas

 
 
 
Classic Solution
Put an awkward corner to use and add in office functionality with a classic secretary. Although the design is antique, a piece like this one has modern appeal. The pullout desk easily accommodates a laptop, and the shelves above the desk, as well as the drawers below it, can be fitted with baskets and boxes for filing paperwork and organizing supplies.
 
 
Tucked-In Storage
Add storage to a minimal, no-frills desk with a small shelf or table tucked underneath. Look for a unit on casters so you can easily slide it out and use the top as an extra work surface.
 
 
Two for One
Line a wall with two identical tables for a chic symmetrical look. This work space, stationed in a living room, can be cleared of office supplies and double as a buffet or bar for hosting parties.
 
 
Cozy Work Space
Turn an awkward closet into an office with a few quick changes. Remove the closet doors and paint (or wallpaper) the interior. Hang shelves along the wall and tuck in a desk for a quick-fix office that packs efficient function into a small sliver of space.
 
 
Build a Desk
For a simple, do-it-yourself desk, employ sturdy file cabinets as a base and a large desktop, or painted panel, as the work surface. Position the desktop on the file cabinets and screw into place.
 
 
Around the Corner
Capitalize on a corner office space by extending upper cabinetry into an L shape rather than just straight across the back of the desk. Use this newfound storage space for display or for office necessities, such as files and desk supplies.
 
 
On a Curve
A curved desk such as this one provides a work surface on both sides of a computer while leaving plenty of space for stationing storage trays and baskets. Use large boxes to tuck supplies under the desk for a quick storage fix.
 
 
Office Alcove
An underused alcove was given new life as an office and storage station. A basic desktop was upgraded with a pretty skirt to conceal storage beneath. Shelves were mounted high along the wall to create more head space above the desk. Higher shelves such as these are ideal for storing infrequently used items. When needed, they are easy to locate but are kept out of the way to make room for things used on a regular basis.
 
 
Living Room Office
Inconspicuously add an office to a living area with a few simple tricks. Incorporate as much concealed storage as possible, such as these clean-front cabinets, which add office functionality without distracting from the rest of the room. Take steps to add in elements to tie the space to the rest of the room. A bamboo chair and burlap-covered bulletin board harmonize with the living room's natural look.
 
 
Perfect for Paperwork
If you need a lot of space for paperwork, consider this setup. Nix the office chairs and basic desk, and replace with plush armchairs and a handsome round table, perfect for spreading out all your materials. Position a bookcase nearby to organize files and archived paperwork.

Modern Home Office 2013 Ideas : Storage & Organization Solutions


Create a home office anywhere with these ideas for streamlined storage and efficient organization.
 

 
Cubby Solution
If floor space is limited, bring storage off the floor and onto a desk. Place a small bookcase on top of a desk, which will give you a space to store supplies at your fingertips.
 
 
Easy Office Filing
Turn an existing dresser or other unit with deep drawers into a file cabinet with one simple addition. Install adjustable hanging file frames (available at office supply stores) in the drawers and develop a filing system with tabbed hanging folders.

 
 
Hidden Office
Turn storage upside down with an inventive way to use kitchen cabinets. Hang a cabinet horizontally and attach piano hinges to the doors so it can open to become a mini desk area. When not in use, the door can simply be closed to conceal the work area and maintain a sleek appearance.
 
 
A Place to Create
If your office space is used for creative endeavors, such as scrapbooking and crafting, incorporate storage around your work space and keep all supplies at your fingertips. This desk area has an abundance of drawers, plus at-your-fingertips supply cups along the back of the desk. Achieve this functionality by drilling large holes the size of silverware cups into a desktop, dropping the cups into the holes, and filling them with scissors, markers, and more.
 
Collaborative Space
Do you need an office for more than one person? Use a dining table as a desk and place it perpendicular to a wall so several people can sit at the table at once. This table bumps up against a wall of built-ins, which add storage. A large bookcase also works wonders for an office setup like this.
 
 
Office with a View
Bump a desk up against a window with a deep window sill and use the sill as an improvised shelf for baskets and boxes. Plus, placing a desk near a window provides plenty of natural light.
 
Smarter Office Storage
In a small space, take office storage to the walls to keep work surfaces clutter-free. In this space, cubbies were mounted to the wall and magazine holders were screwed into the bottom of the cubbies for an innovative mail sorter. For an easy and affordable work surface, transform a slab door into a desktop by mounting it to a wall and placing bookcases or file cabinets beneath it for support.
 
 
Kitchen Office
A small desk tucked into a kitchen is suited for many tasks, such as doing homework or jotting down a grocery list. Incorporate a few drawers and cubbies to maximize the space's storage capacity.
 
 
Perfect Office Setup
Create a corner office at home by zoning a section of a larger room (such as a living room or family room) as a work zone. Behind this desk, a large bookcase fulfills all the storage needs of this work area in one simple system. For more storage, hang floating shelves along the wall. When planning your home office, make sure there are adequate outlets nearby for computers, printers, and task lighting.

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Tuesday, September 11, 2012

Halloween Party Favor and Treat Bag 2012 Ideas from HGTV

Send Halloween guests home with one of these adorable party favors or treat bags. Our free printable labels, embellishments and photo booth accessories will make it a snap to throw a kid-pleasing monster mash.
 
 

Indulge Their Sweet Tooth

Kids love lollipops, especially old-fashioned swirly ones. To make these easy party favors, remove original packaging and pop the lollipops into clear cellophane bags. Tie a bow to close each bag, then finish with a printed and punched tag design, template attached below.
 

Thank Them for "Popping" By

With so much candy around at Halloween parties, a salty snack will hit the spot. Whip up some homemade kettle-popped corn or one of our popcorn recipes below and place in scallop-edged cups. Embellish with dimensional scrapbooking stickers (found at craft stores) or one of our free printables. If you're sending a cup home with your party guests, wrap it in cellophane and tie with ribbon so the popcorn will stay fresh.
 
 

Go a Little Batty

Easily turn wooden clothespins into cute Halloween bag clips. Download our bat-shaped template, print it onto card stock, cut out, then attach it to the clothespin with hot glue or double-sided tape. Fill a clear bag with Halloween candy or gumballs and attach the clip for a fun favor
 
 

Cupcakes To Go

Everyone loves cupcakes, especially kids! Place cupcakes in paper or plastic bowls and wrap with cellophane for a portable container they can take with them. Add one of our free printable Halloween tags to dress it up.
 
 

Follow the Ball

This classic game with a Halloween twist is sure to provide tons of fun for the kids. Give each child a set of three white paper bowls with "eyes" made by hole-punching black paper and attaching the punched dots with glue. Give kids a gumball and show them how to play the game with a partner by hiding the gumball under one of the ghosts, moving the ghosts around and having his/her partner guess which ghost has the gumball.
 
 

Candy Favor Boxes

Premade Halloween boxes are a quick-and-easy option to fill with candy or small toys. Embellished with one of our printable tag designs, party guests or trick or treaters will be excited to open them to see what's inside.
 

Put Chocolate Under Wraps

Kids love candy bars after all, who doesn't? For a super simple party favor, use one of our printable wrapper designs to dress up a classic candy bar to match the party decor. Just print the template onto standard copier paper, then cut out the design and use double-sided tape to attach the Halloween wrapper to a chocolate bar.
 
 

Candy-Corn-Colored Gumball Necklace

All you need to make this sweet necklace is gumballs, ribbon and a few tools. Use a skewer to puncture each gumball, one side at a time. Thread ribbon through a large needle and slide through gumball, tying a knot between each as you go. Add a ribbon bow for a little extra finishing touch.
 
 

Spooktacular Sodas

Being a party guest is thirsty work, and what kid could resist these dressed-up soda bottles? Chill sodas prior to the party and embellish right before it starts with our printable black-and-white striped paper and a punched tag. Tie on a straw with twine; open bottles if guests will be enjoying them during the party, or leave the caps on if they'll be taking them home as a favor.
 
 
Rock Star Kids love rock candy sticks.

Place them by the door and they won't be able to resist taking one for the road as they leave the party. To add a little embellishment, cut strips from our printable black-and-white striped paper, attach with double-sided tape and cut into a flag shape. Display on a white platter so the colors pop.

 
 

Mason Jar Favors

Mason jars are everywhere these days and they're a great, affordable party favor. For Halloween, fill with white candy to make a ghost or orange candy to make a pumpkin. Top with a circle cut from our printable black-and-white striped paper and replace the lid. Use decals or stickers to create the ghost or pumpkin face. Tie on one of our printable tags with twine to complete the look.

 

Them Bones, Them Bones

Mini candy bones give these marshmallow treats a crunchy texture kids love. To create them, skewer a regular-sized marshmallow onto a 6-inch lollipop stick. Dip into melted chocolate and, while the chocolate is still warm, roll in candy bones. For perfect presentation, display in small cupcake liners and top each stick with a little black bow.
 
 

Trick-or-Treat Tubes

These clear tubes are turning up at parties everywhere not only because they're adorable, but because they're so easy! Just fill with candy or gumballs and top with a printable Halloween flag design.
 
 

Cookie Monster

Another simple idea is to send your guests home with a sweetly packaged cookie. Whether you bake them at home or purchase them at the bakery, kids will be happy to have a sweet treat to enjoy after the party. Place cookies in Halloween-themed bags, wrap in twine and attach a printable Halloween tag.
 
 

Halloween Linen Sacks

These small linen sacks came pre-printed with their Halloween designs, but you could easily dress up plain sacks with foam stamps or a stencil and craft paint. Fill with candy and toys for the party guests to take home

Saturday, September 8, 2012

DIY Curtains and Shades 2013 Ideas

Do-it-yourself curtains and drapes are easier to make than you might think. With a little bit of fabric, a staple gun and some creativity, you can fashion an interesting look for your home.
These projects can all be done without making a single stitch.
 
 
Napkin Cafe Curtains
Turn patterned cloth napkins into a kicky pair of curtains by joining their edges with jeans rivets spaced every 2 inches. Then add large grommets or rivets along the tops of the panels and thread onto a curtain rod. You can buy rivet and grommet kits at fabric stores. To install, cut a small hole in the fabric, insert both pieces of the rivet or grommet, and use the tool that comes in the kit to press them together.

 
Towel Window Treatment
Use kicky kitchen dish towels for fun window treatments. Simply clip drapery hooks to the top edge of a dishtowel and hang from a cafe curtain rod. The towels are easy to remove for washing and can also be changed out seasonally. Plus, when you've decided to move on to a different window treatment, the towels can be used for their original purpose of drying dishes.
 
 
Buttoned Up
The buttons and burlap that jazz up these plain white tab-top cafe curtains come right off when it's time to wash them. That's because the buttons are attached with magnets rather than sewn on. Tie hemp cord through each button, then glue a magnet onto the back. Cut burlap into a strip 1-1/2 inches wide and pull off a few of the long threads to fringe the edge. Lay the burlap on top of the curtain and hold it in place with a magnetic button at each tab.
 
 
Trimmed Tablecloths
Romance a window with a pretty curtain made from a tablecloth. Look for a square or rectangular one with tassels, ruffles, or scallops they'll add instant detail that you don't have to sew on. Cut the tablecloth into two panels. (A 60-inch square cloth is handy because you can just cut it in half.) Hem the cut edges with iron-on seam tape, and hang with drapery clips.
 
 
Wrapped Windows
Made from shawls found for $8 each, these panels are an inexpensive alternative to custom window treatments. Cut away the fringe from one end of each shawl and hot-glue decorative trim along the raw end. Hang from clip rings.
 
 
Floor-Length Tab-Top Panels
Velvet ribbon in three sherbet shades turns plain white tab-top curtains into an elegant treatment. To create the look, lay out the panels and attach horizontal bands of ribbon with fabric glue. To make the ties at the top, cut the tabs off, then cut six evenly placed, 1-inch horizontal slits across each panel. Finish by cutting V shapes out of the ends of each tie.

Tip: Washable fabric glue will be strong enough to withstand a washing machine and will remain clear and flexible.
 
 
Rickrack Panels
Add drama to a room by hanging tab-top panels embellished with a grid of ribbon and rickrack. Choosing natural colors and textures keeps the boldness of the pattern in check. Measure carefully and plan ahead for proper ribbon placement. Each X design extends from side to side and repeats three times from top to bottom. Glue down all the caramel-color ribbon first, then center and glue on lengths of lime green rickrack. Finish by gluing a large button at each intersection. For a nicely finished edge, cut the ribbon 1 inch longer than needed, wrap it around the edge of the curtain, and glue it on the back. Finish the look with a button of your choice. We chose a wooden button to complement the caramel-color ribbon.

Tip: Before adding embellishments, first press the draperies to remove all wrinkles and creases. Accurate positioning of ribbons and trims will be easier on a smooth surface.
 
 
Ribboned Romans
Confining the embellishment to the edges of this Roman shade keeps the look clean. As the shade is raised, the ribboned edges fall into graceful pleats. We combined several different widths and colors of ribbon. After planning the design, stretch the shade out on a flat surface and glue the ribbons around the outside edges one layer at a time. Allow the ribbons to extend an inch beyond the shade width so they can be folded over and glued to the back for a finished look.
 
 
Stenciled Curtain Panels
Dress up purchased panels with a fun stencil. Lay a panel out flat, with kraft paper underneath it to absorb extra paint. Place the stencil on the panel and use fabric paint to paint on the design.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Easy Organizing Tips for Closets 2013 Ideas

Closets are valuable storage space. Make your closet work harder with a clear organization strategy and the right tools from modular closet storage systems to the simplest of shelves and bins. Check out this ideas that can be adapted to any closet space.
 
 
Strategy: Folding Clothes
If you prefer to fold your clothes or have a lot of clothing that is best stored folded, Meryl Starr, a professional organizer in New York and author of The Organizing Workbook, recommends these tips for folding clothes within your closet.

1- Shelves should be about 12 inches deep, roughly the depth of a stack of clothes. You don't want a lot of wasted space in front or behind.

2- Ventilated shelves promote airflow around folded clothes, which cuts down on the possibility of mold, mildew, and pests.

3- Group like with like (jeans with jeans, etc.). Same-size items stack more neatly. Put clothes you use most in the center at eye level.

4- Don't stack higher than about a foot, and leave at least 6 inches between the top of the stack and the next shelf for easy reaching in.

5- Add drawers to collect smaller items. If you don't have drawers, use a basket or two. Position drawers below eye level so it's easy to peer in.
 
 
Strategy: Hanging Clothes
Hanging up clothing inside a closet is an easy way to keep clothing organized, especially if you have a lot of dress clothes, suits, or dresses. Lorie Marrero, creator of The Clutter Diet online program, recommends these tips:

1- For the double-hang area, put the shortest clothes on the top rod and hang the bottom one as high as possible under them. Use space freed up near the floor for a shoe rack or storage bins.

2- Organize garments by category and separate with hanging labels; the more specific the categories the better. For example, subdivide your shirts into short- and long-sleeve, or casual and dressy. Bonus points: Organize by color within a category.

3- Keep shoes, purses, and jewelry in hanging organizers there are dozens on the market so you can see them alongside your clothes.
 
 
Strategy: Storage for Shoes
If you love shoes and deciding how to store them is your main closet woe, try these tips from John Trosko, a professional organizer and co-author of The Experts’ Guide to Doing Things Faster.

1- Slim shoes, such as flats and flip-flops, can be stored two to a cubby. Use spare slots for belts, scarves, and clutches.

2- Drawers give the closet a polished, built-in look, plus handy closet door storage for folded clothes. Bulky items like sweaters and purses can go on the open shelves.

3- Eke out another sliver of storage by putting a shallow basket on the shelf below the top row of hanging clothes. Use it for things that fold up small, such as tights, T’s, or socks
 
 
Planning: Clean Up & Clear Out
Plan a closet makeover by measuring your current closet to determine hanging requirements and storage needs. Next, you'll need to clear everything out of the closet so the new system can be installed. This is a good time to go through items you can no longer use and donate them to charity.
 
 
Planning: Shelf It
You might think the more shelves, the better but this is not always true. The shelves themselves take up inches of precious storage space, and too many of them can make it difficult to stack or remove items. It's best to design shelves that will fit the various items you have to store.
 
 
Planning: Shoe Solution
If shoes flood your closet floor, develop a smart strategy for storing them. Keep the shoes you wear all the time accessible on shelves if you have room. Store seasonal and special occasion shoes in easy to see clear plastic boxes on the top shelf of your closet. Or simply reuse the original box and attach a picture of the shoes to the front of the box.
 
 
Planning: Space Management
If your bedroom is small, consider placing your dresser inside the closet. You can install shelving above it and still maximize the vertical space a closet has to offer.
 
 
Planning: Closet for Two
Whether it's for kids or for a his-and-hers, a shared closet works best when territories are clearly defined. Place a tower of drawers in the middle of a reach in closet, which will give each closet occupant their own side of the closet. Assign drawers to each person to achieve shared closet bliss.
 
 
Features: Closet Cubbies
Organize your own closet or a child's with a combination of double-hanging rods, drawers, and shelves. Drawers corral small items such as socks while cubbies hold folded items. Upper shelves can store out of season shoes and clothing in clear bins with lids.
 
 
Features: Slanted Shoe Rack
Storing shoes on slanted shelves makes it easier to see the shelf contents. Before installing slanted shelves, consider how many pairs of shoes you need to store and about what size they are. Ankle boots will need more height than flats. You might want to space the shelves differently, or decide on a set spacing based on the height of your tallest shoes. If you have a lot of tall boots, consider storing them elsewhere, such as beneath a hanging rod. Look for inserts that will help boot shafts stay upright at organizational stores.
 
 
Features: Built-In Drawers
Consider built-in drawers for storing sweaters, undergarments, and accessories. Shorter drawers might only store a stack of four T-shirts or two sweaters, which is beneficial because you don’t have to dig through a large stack to find what you’re looking for, but a series of shorter drawers might not offer the same amount of storage space as larger, taller drawers. When you have more drawers, it means you need to have more space for the tracks and other drawer hardware.
 
 
Features: Lighting
Whether your closet is big or small, good lighting will make it even more functional. Look for ceiling-mount lighting that doesn’t need to be hardwired as a quick update for a reach-in closet. Lamps can be used in a walk-in closet for extra illumination, which is beneficial for dressing areas. If your walk-in closet has a window, install a light-blocking window covering. That way, you can keep out the natural light when you’re not using the closet. Constant sunlight might cause some clothing to fade.
 
 
Features: Double Bars for Kids
For a narrow and short space, stair-step rods for kids’ clothing storage. Since their clothing is short and slender, you can hang one rod higher and further back in the closet and another bar lower and more towards the front to get a double layer of storage. Consider tension shower rods, which can be installed without making holes in the wall and are easier to change as the child gets older.

 
 
Features: Double Bars for Adults
Using double closet rods one over the other  is the best way to squeeze more storage space out of a closet. Be sure to measure the length of each item you'll be hanging there and allow another 6 inches of clearance above and below each rod. Blouses, shirts, skirts, jackets, and kids' clothes will all fit on double rods.

2013 Home Office Storage Ideas

 
 
 
Classic Solution
Put an awkward corner to use and add in office functionality with a classic secretary. Although the design is antique, a piece like this one has modern appeal. The pullout desk easily accommodates a laptop, and the shelves above the desk, as well as the drawers below it, can be fitted with baskets and boxes for filing paperwork and organizing supplies.
 
 
Tucked-In Storage
Add storage to a minimal, no-frills desk with a small shelf or table tucked underneath. Look for a unit on casters so you can easily slide it out and use the top as an extra work surface.
 
 
Two for One
Line a wall with two identical tables for a chic symmetrical look. This work space, stationed in a living room, can be cleared of office supplies and double as a buffet or bar for hosting parties.
 
 
Cozy Work Space
Turn an awkward closet into an office with a few quick changes. Remove the closet doors and paint (or wallpaper) the interior. Hang shelves along the wall and tuck in a desk for a quick-fix office that packs efficient function into a small sliver of space.
 
 
Build a Desk
For a simple, do-it-yourself desk, employ sturdy file cabinets as a base and a large desktop, or painted panel, as the work surface. Position the desktop on the file cabinets and screw into place.
 
 
Around the Corner
Capitalize on a corner office space by extending upper cabinetry into an L shape rather than just straight across the back of the desk. Use this newfound storage space for display or for office necessities, such as files and desk supplies.
 
 
On a Curve
A curved desk such as this one provides a work surface on both sides of a computer while leaving plenty of space for stationing storage trays and baskets. Use large boxes to tuck supplies under the desk for a quick storage fix.
 
 
Office Alcove
An underused alcove was given new life as an office and storage station. A basic desktop was upgraded with a pretty skirt to conceal storage beneath. Shelves were mounted high along the wall to create more head space above the desk. Higher shelves such as these are ideal for storing infrequently used items. When needed, they are easy to locate but are kept out of the way to make room for things used on a regular basis.
 
 
Living Room Office
Inconspicuously add an office to a living area with a few simple tricks. Incorporate as much concealed storage as possible, such as these clean-front cabinets, which add office functionality without distracting from the rest of the room. Take steps to add in elements to tie the space to the rest of the room. A bamboo chair and burlap-covered bulletin board harmonize with the living room's natural look.
 
 
Perfect for Paperwork
If you need a lot of space for paperwork, consider this setup. Nix the office chairs and basic desk, and replace with plush armchairs and a handsome round table, perfect for spreading out all your materials. Position a bookcase nearby to organize files and archived paperwork.

Modern Home Office 2013 Ideas : Storage & Organization Solutions


Create a home office anywhere with these ideas for streamlined storage and efficient organization.
 

 
Cubby Solution
If floor space is limited, bring storage off the floor and onto a desk. Place a small bookcase on top of a desk, which will give you a space to store supplies at your fingertips.
 
 
Easy Office Filing
Turn an existing dresser or other unit with deep drawers into a file cabinet with one simple addition. Install adjustable hanging file frames (available at office supply stores) in the drawers and develop a filing system with tabbed hanging folders.

 
 
Hidden Office
Turn storage upside down with an inventive way to use kitchen cabinets. Hang a cabinet horizontally and attach piano hinges to the doors so it can open to become a mini desk area. When not in use, the door can simply be closed to conceal the work area and maintain a sleek appearance.
 
 
A Place to Create
If your office space is used for creative endeavors, such as scrapbooking and crafting, incorporate storage around your work space and keep all supplies at your fingertips. This desk area has an abundance of drawers, plus at-your-fingertips supply cups along the back of the desk. Achieve this functionality by drilling large holes the size of silverware cups into a desktop, dropping the cups into the holes, and filling them with scissors, markers, and more.
 
Collaborative Space
Do you need an office for more than one person? Use a dining table as a desk and place it perpendicular to a wall so several people can sit at the table at once. This table bumps up against a wall of built-ins, which add storage. A large bookcase also works wonders for an office setup like this.
 
 
Office with a View
Bump a desk up against a window with a deep window sill and use the sill as an improvised shelf for baskets and boxes. Plus, placing a desk near a window provides plenty of natural light.
 
Smarter Office Storage
In a small space, take office storage to the walls to keep work surfaces clutter-free. In this space, cubbies were mounted to the wall and magazine holders were screwed into the bottom of the cubbies for an innovative mail sorter. For an easy and affordable work surface, transform a slab door into a desktop by mounting it to a wall and placing bookcases or file cabinets beneath it for support.
 
 
Kitchen Office
A small desk tucked into a kitchen is suited for many tasks, such as doing homework or jotting down a grocery list. Incorporate a few drawers and cubbies to maximize the space's storage capacity.
 
 
Perfect Office Setup
Create a corner office at home by zoning a section of a larger room (such as a living room or family room) as a work zone. Behind this desk, a large bookcase fulfills all the storage needs of this work area in one simple system. For more storage, hang floating shelves along the wall. When planning your home office, make sure there are adequate outlets nearby for computers, printers, and task lighting.